I’m slowly working my way through every single menu item at the British Bulldog

So we go to the British Bulldog a heck of a lot, as it has soccer which must be watched. Many of those visits involve eating foodstuffs. I have A.D.D. of the stomach, however, which means I’m more or less going to eventually try every item they have on the menu.

fish and chips

I’ve actually had their fish & chips a few times, as it is delicious and amazing. The pieces of fish are ginormous, so I’ll generally have a piece to take home. Being all American, I’ve generally been one to just dunk the fish in ketchup, but I’m getting turned on to using creamier sauces for the fish, as well as adding a bit of vinegar.

And for some more British fare, we’ve got bangers and mash.

bangers and mash

So I try to like as many vegetables as possible, but there are some cases where I’m just not a fan. Peas and carrots fall into this category. I like them in certain circumstances (like in fried rice, for instance) but rarely seek them out on their own. In any case, I enjoyed the bangers and mash despite the presence of certain undesirable vegetables. Bangers (aka sausages) are always delightful, and I’ve rarely met a pile of potatoes and gravy I didn’t like. Having these elements sculpted into a majestic mound of meat and starch is always a bonus as well.

saag paneer

There’s a section of the menu dedicated to Pakistani food, and the portions are giant. The saag paneer filled me up for two good meals. Saag paneer, which is essentially chunks of cheese in a spinach sauce, is generally amazing. It also falls into that category of “vegetables I only like in certain circumstances.” Fresh spinach is just fine for me in sandwiches and salads and whatnot, but cooked spinach is a bit disgusting unless used strategically. The only two strategic uses I can think of at the moment are either buried in a massive amount of cheese, as served in dishes like manicotti or shells & cheese, or, saag paneer. Saag paneer also falls under the category of “it’s vegetarian but you won’t really care because GIANT CHUNKS OF CHEESE.” I’ve also not had enough saag paneer in my lifetime to know good saag paneer from bad saag paneer, so I’ll just assume it’s all good until I know otherwise.

chappli kebabs

I’ve had a few other Pakistani dishes from the Bulldog, and sweet Jesus my poor mouth. The chappli kebabs pictured above do mention being spicy in their menu listing, but other items are similarly dangerous, based on my experience. I may have lucked out with the saag paneer, actually. Rumor has it that there are two chefs, one which tends to make the Pakistani food significantly spicier than the other. Mind you, those chappli kebabs were still tasty – I just needed to significantly bolster them with every single side item available, and then have a refreshing beverage very close at hand to cool my flaming mouth. The inevitable leftovers lasted me a decent while, too – I ended up making some of my own basmati rice to accompany said leftover kebabs, and found that adding some plain yogurt to the mix really helped deal with the spice as well.

Anyhow, I think I only have one or two Pakistani dishes left to try. At some point I may venture over to the more American side of the menu (I’ve had a burger, but not too much beyond that), and there’s a whole range of appetizers I’ve yet to explore. It’s not often I have a restaurant I eat at this regularly, and it’s an interesting thing to stop letting yourself get the same dish twice. Anyhow, the Bulldog has pretty good food and you should totally go eat there!

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