Boston Cream Pie, aka Pudding Saves The Day!

Boston cream pie is so freaking good. You New Englanders have no idea how good you have it, with your pie trees and all. Living in Colorado, we are not so fortunate as to have access to pie trees (too dry out here or something). So when I want a Boston cream pie, I’ve gotta make it myself! Well, or spend money, but a pre-purchased pie doesn’t make nearly as interesting of a blog post as one I’ve screwed up delicately constructed myself.

I don’t make large desserts like this too often – there’s only two of us under this roof, plus a cat who refuses to eat cake no matter how much I dump in her bowl. I’d try making a cat food cake, but she’d probably turn her nose up at that as well (Estha is quite the snob). Then Drew and I would be stuck eating it, and as you well know cat food breath is far worse than even garlic breath! Anyhow, we had relatives over, so I’m all like “Yay! Cake time!”

Now, a vision came to me some time ago of a really easy way to make Boston cream pie. Essentially, you use a yellow box cake and vanilla box pudding, so that the only truly home-made part is the frosting. Easy enough, right?

So, first I made the two layers of cake in my handy-dandy round pans.

cake layer

For future reference, for myself and the rest of the Internet, don’t just grease the pan. Line the pan with some freaking wax paper, otherwise your cake will fall out of the pan in chunks!

layer with pudding

Due to the vanilla pudding, you can’t see the worst of the cake layer disaster. Pudding saves the day! Incidentally, while in most cases cooked pudding is far superior to instant pudding, if you’re making the pudding to slop onto cake, instant seems to work just fine.

The second cake layer wasn’t quite as disastrous as the first, but it still wasn’t exactly what I’d call a “success.”

Untopped boston cream pie

Aaaand, the frosting. I did not do my research on this one. There exist a variety of Boston cream pie frosting recipes out there on the internets, but unfortunately all of them call for heavy cream. I did not have heavy cream, and the grocery store seemed oh so far away. So I made up some sort of frosting via melting a gargantuan amount of chocolate chips, and mixing with butter and milk. This was less successful then it could have been (note to self: cold milk added to hot melty chocolate makes cold not-melty chocolate). But, I eventually got it to the point of spreading on the top of the cake. And, about a minute after I spread the frosting on the cake, it solidified into chocolate bar level hardness.

And, uh, the cake got mostly eaten before I remembered to take a picture of the final product. So here’s a crumbly fourth of a cake!

Boston cream pie remnants

Drew liked this cake far more then I thought he would, given the fact that it was not completely comprised of chocolate. The relatives enjoyed it as well. I personally thought the frosting was entirely too hard, which leads me to suspect some minor politeness on their part. The next time I make this (and I definitely would do this again), I’ll have some heavy cream on hand for more satisfactory frosting. This time around, though, I found that microwaving it make the frosting soft enough to function as frosting should. And even with the frosting being more like a layer of chocolate bar on top of the cake, the pudding just made everything so gooey and delightful that it didn’t really matter. Pudding saves the day!

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4 Comments

  1. overconcerned October 29, 2010 9:30 pm

    Oh, that looks amazing! My cakes always look something like that because I'm never prepared… ah well there's always next time. And maybe you can make Bostom Cream Cup-Pies. :]

  2. Wei-Wei October 29, 2010 10:45 pm